iConference 2010 Summary

 

Contents

Quick Links
By the Numbers
Organizers
Program Committee
Awards
Keynote Speakers
Sponsors

Quick Links

Location: Urbana-Champaign, IL, USA
Date: 3 – 6 February, 2010
Host: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Graduate School of Library and Information Science
Printed Call for Participation: http://ischools.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/iConf2010_cfp.pdf
Submission Template: ACM Template
Official Proceedings:
https://www.ideals.illinois.edu/handle/2142/14873
Printed Conference Brochure and Schedule: http://ischools.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/iConference-2010-Program.pdf
Doctoral Colloquium Brochure: http://ischools.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/iConf2010_DoctoralColloquium.pdf

By The Numbers

Total participants: 346
Papers presented: 52
Posters presented: 77
Workshops: 2
Roundtables: 14
Wildcards: 6
Doctoral Colloquium Participants: 16

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2010 Organizers

Conference Chair: John Unsworth, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Program Co-Chairs: Howard Rosenbaum, Indiana University; Karen E. Fisher, University of Washington

Local Organizing Committee (all from University of Illinois, unless otherwise noted):

  • Cindy Ashwill
  • Carie Burgess, Microsoft
  • Matt Beth
  • Heekyung Choi
  • Ingbert Floyd
  • Sean Goggins, Drexel University
  • Jonathan Grudin, Microsoft
  • Sharon Johnson
  • Natalie Michael, University of Washington
  • Maeve Reilly, iSchools
  • Allen Renear
  • Kim Schmidt
  • Richard Urban
  • Dan Wright

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2010 Program Committee

  • Alessandro Acquisti, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Harry Bruce, University of Washington
  • Elke Greifeneder, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
  • Joe Hall, UC Berkeley School of Information/Princeton University Center for
    Information Technology Policy
  • Susan Herring, Indiana University
  • Lori Kendall, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
  • Xia Lin, Drexel University
  • Jeffrey Pomerantz, University of North Carolina
  • Jaime Snyder, Syracuse University
  • Mike Twidale, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
  • Ping Wang, University of Maryland, College Park
  • Terry Weech, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
  • Kate Williams, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

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2010 Awards

The following awards were presentation at iConference 2011.

Best Paper

  • “Of mouse and men: Computers and geeks as cinematic icons in age of ICTD,” Joyojeet Pal, ATLAS Institute, University of Colorado

Best Student Paper

  • “Music and Mood: Where Theory and Reality Meet,” Xiao Hu, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Best Posters

  • “The Jersey Punk Basement Scene: Exploring the Information Underground,” Joe Sanchez, Aaron Trammell, Jessa Lingal and Nathan Graham, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey
  • “Applying multimodal discourse analysis to the study of image-enabled communication,” Jaime Snyder, School of Information Studies, Syracuse University

von Dran Award

Liz_and_Toni
Presented by Elizabeth Liddy (pictured left), Dean, School of Information Studies, Syracuse University
Ray von Dran, dean of the School of Information Studies, Syracuse University, 1995-2007, was a dynamic and pow- erful force in both the development of the School of Information Studies at Syracuse University and the formation of the iSchools movement. In his honor, the iSchools have established an award to recognize others who have demonstrated Ray’s com- mitment to excellence and leadership. This year’s recipient is Toni Carbo, teaching professor at the College of Information Science and Technology (the iSchool) Center for Graduate Studies, Drexel University. She was professor at the School of Information Sciences (SIS) and Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Pittsburgh from 1986-May 2009, and she served as dean of SIS at Pitt from 1986 to 2002. She has served as executive director of the U.S. National Commission on Libraries and Information Science (NCLIS), the government agency responsible for advising the President and U.S. Congress on policy and planning in the infor- mation field. Her work in the information field began in 1962 and includes extensive experience with information service producers and users (both libraries and database producers) and in research in the areas of information policy and information ethics and in the use of information.

DARPA Presentation

John Yen, Director of Strategic Research Initiatives, College of Information Science and Technology, Pennsylvania State University
In 2009, the iSchools collaborated on the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Network Chal- lenge to search throughout the United States for 10 red balloons. Through the use of social networking and the iSchools network, the iSchools team placed 10th.

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Keynote Speakers

Stephan Wolfram


Founder & CEO of Wolfram Research—Creator of Mathematica and Wolfram|Alpha, and author of “A New Kind of Science”
Stephen Wolfram is a distinguished scientist, inventor, author, and business leader. Born in London in 1959, Wolfram was educated at Eton, Oxford, and Caltech. He published his first scientific paper at the age of 15, and had received his Ph.D. in theoretical physics from Caltech by the age of 20. Wolfram’s early scientific work was mainly in high-energy physics, quantum field theory, and cosmology, and included several now-classic results. Having started to use computers in 1973, Wolfram rapidly became a leader in the emerging field of scientific computing, and in 1979 he began the construction of SMP—the first modern computer algebra system—which he released commercially in 1981. In recognition of his early work in physics and computing, Wolfram became in 1981 the youngest recipient of a MacArthur Prize Fellowship.

Following scientific work on complex systems research, in 1986 Wolfram founded the first research center and the first journal in the field, Complex Systems. Then, after a highly successful career in academia—first at Caltech, then at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, and finally as professor of physics, mathematics, and computer science at the University of Illinois—Wolfram launched Wolfram Research, Inc., where he began the develop- ment of Mathematica in late 1986.

After more than ten years of highly concentrated work, Wolfram described his achievements in his 1200-page book A New Kind of Science. Building on Mathematica, A New Kind of Science, and the success of Wolfram Research, Wolfram in May 2009 launched Wolfram|Alpha—a long-term project to make as much of the world’s knowledge as possible computable, and accessible to everyone.

Marti Hearst


Professor, School of Information, University of California, Berkeley

Dr. Marti Hearst is a professor in the School of Information at the Uni- versity of California, Berkeley. She received her B.A., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in computer science from UC Berkeley and was a member of the research staff at Xerox PARC from 1994 to 1997.
A primary focus of Hearst’s research is user interfaces for search. She just completed the first book on the topic of search user interfaces, and she has invented or participated in several well-known search interface projects including the Flamenco project that investigated and promoted the use of faceted metadata for collection naviga- tion. Hearst’s other research areas include computational linguistics, information visualization, and analysis of social media.

Hearst has received an NSF CAREER award, an IBM Faculty Award, a Google Research Award, an Okawa Foundation Fellowship, two Excellence in Teaching Awards, and has been principle investigator for more than $3M in research grants. During the 2009-2010 academic year Hearst is on leave and working on e-government in the Obama administration, with a focus on search.

“An iSchooler Goes to Washington: IT Research Challenges to Better Help Government Help Citizens”

Information technology is playing a new central role in the governing of the United States with a focus on promoting open government and citizen participation. In many cases, new technology is being adopted, or existing technology is being used in new ways, and there is a pressing need for research on several fronts. The topics studied at iSchools are central to these questions, ranging from online collaboration to analyzing multimedia to open publishing to online privacy. This talk summarizes some of the questions Hearst has come across that would benefit from iSchool research contributions.
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2010 Sponsors

Microsoft Research
iConference Sponsors - Microsoft Research

National Science Foundation
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Yahoo!
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Illinois Graduate School of Library and Information Science

Illinois Office of the Vice Chancellor

Illinois Informatics Institute

Host Institution

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Graduate School of Library and Information Science

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